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> Does democracy mean nothing?, more student accommodation to be built in Chester
3mm
post Jan 9 2018, 06:46 PM
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More student accommodation is to be built in Newtown, despite unanimous protests from CWaC's planning committee.

Chester Standard

The council leader has slammed a government planning inspector's decision to allow a huge eight-storey student accommodation block to be built in Chester. Members of Cheshire West and Chester Council's (CWaC) planning committee unanimously rejected PJ Properties (Chester) Ltd's application for the 376-bed block on Hoole Way in April last year. But it has emerged that the company's appeal to The Planning Inspectorate against the council's decision has been successful. And to rub salt into the wounds, the developer has applied for CWaC to foot the bill for all costs associated with the appeal.

Council leader Samantha Dixon responded with shock on Twitter, saying: “I am staggered and dismayed by the inspector's decision. Does democracy mean nothing?”. And Reg Barritt, who has campaigned against the 'studentification' of Chester for many years, was similarly appalled. Mr Barritt, the general secretary of campaign group Chester Community Voice UK, told the Standard that local democracy meant nothing in the face of current national planning policies. “The people that are the community of Chester are very much side-lined while predatory development interests overrun the place in which we live,” he said. “Our councillors seem powerless to do much about it.”

He suggested the city needs to reintroduce 'area forum meetings' so residents could raise concerns and join forces to oppose a perceived tidal wave of student accommodation developments. This newspaper reported in April that plans had been rejected for PJ Properties' £30 million student block on land near Black Diamond Street and Hoole Way, near the Royal Mail centre and railway bridge. Having visited the site and heard residents' concerns, locally-elected councillors on the planning committee queued up to slam the proposals. Cllr Gill Watson said: “It looks awful. It's just not something I can support.” And Cllr Eleanor Johnson added: “It's huge, it's enormous; it's totally out of keeping.” Members said that nearby homes would be completely dwarfed by the student block, and would likely receive little natural light.

“They're going to be blacked out completely,” said Cllr Norman Wright. “They will need lights on in the middle of the day!”. Cllr Dixon, council leader, said she agreed with comments by The Civic Trust that the plans resembled the much-maligned former Travelodge on the city's fountains roundabout. “It's an excellent example of 'pile it high and sell it cheap',” she told the committee. Lisa Miller, representing 50 households with residents' group Newtown Chester Locals, said the noise and mess caused by students would irrevocably affect people's quality of life. “It will create a chaotic parking crisis,” she added.

Ben Roberts, representing the applicant, had tried in vain to convince members that the development represented a “high quality building” fit for a gateway into the city. By offering dedicated student accommodation it would free up 100 to 150 traditional homes in the city and “help the university attract the best students”, he said. The main entrance was on Hoole Way, meaning local businesses would benefit and the students would not need to venture into Black Diamond Street and St Anne Street.

However, his words failed to hit their mark and the application was rejected on the grounds of design, scale and impact on public amenity. But the developer lodged an appeal and nine months later planning inspector Andrew McGlone announced his decision. He wrote: “In my judgement, even though the proposed building would be next to low-rise residential properties, it would be in keeping with the character and appearance of the area which has a blend of different scaled development, due to its design, height, mass and scale. “I do not consider that the building would be incongruous and dominant.”


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Neil Fishers Big...
post Jan 9 2018, 08:59 PM
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QUOTE (3mm @ Jan 9 2018, 06:46 PM) *
More student accommodation is to be built in Newtown, despite unanimous protests from CWaC's planning committee.

Chester Standard

The council leader has slammed a government planning inspector's decision to allow a huge eight-storey student accommodation block to be built in Chester. Members of Cheshire West and Chester Council's (CWaC) planning committee unanimously rejected PJ Properties (Chester) Ltd's application for the 376-bed block on Hoole Way in April last year. But it has emerged that the company's appeal to The Planning Inspectorate against the council's decision has been successful. And to rub salt into the wounds, the developer has applied for CWaC to foot the bill for all costs associated with the appeal.

Council leader Samantha Dixon responded with shock on Twitter, saying: “I am staggered and dismayed by the inspector's decision. Does democracy mean nothing?”. And Reg Barritt, who has campaigned against the 'studentification' of Chester for many years, was similarly appalled. Mr Barritt, the general secretary of campaign group Chester Community Voice UK, told the Standard that local democracy meant nothing in the face of current national planning policies. “The people that are the community of Chester are very much side-lined while predatory development interests overrun the place in which we live,” he said. “Our councillors seem powerless to do much about it.”

He suggested the city needs to reintroduce 'area forum meetings' so residents could raise concerns and join forces to oppose a perceived tidal wave of student accommodation developments. This newspaper reported in April that plans had been rejected for PJ Properties' £30 million student block on land near Black Diamond Street and Hoole Way, near the Royal Mail centre and railway bridge. Having visited the site and heard residents' concerns, locally-elected councillors on the planning committee queued up to slam the proposals. Cllr Gill Watson said: “It looks awful. It's just not something I can support.” And Cllr Eleanor Johnson added: “It's huge, it's enormous; it's totally out of keeping.” Members said that nearby homes would be completely dwarfed by the student block, and would likely receive little natural light.

“They're going to be blacked out completely,” said Cllr Norman Wright. “They will need lights on in the middle of the day!”. Cllr Dixon, council leader, said she agreed with comments by The Civic Trust that the plans resembled the much-maligned former Travelodge on the city's fountains roundabout. “It's an excellent example of 'pile it high and sell it cheap',” she told the committee. Lisa Miller, representing 50 households with residents' group Newtown Chester Locals, said the noise and mess caused by students would irrevocably affect people's quality of life. “It will create a chaotic parking crisis,” she added.

Ben Roberts, representing the applicant, had tried in vain to convince members that the development represented a “high quality building” fit for a gateway into the city. By offering dedicated student accommodation it would free up 100 to 150 traditional homes in the city and “help the university attract the best students”, he said. The main entrance was on Hoole Way, meaning local businesses would benefit and the students would not need to venture into Black Diamond Street and St Anne Street.

However, his words failed to hit their mark and the application was rejected on the grounds of design, scale and impact on public amenity. But the developer lodged an appeal and nine months later planning inspector Andrew McGlone announced his decision. He wrote: “In my judgement, even though the proposed building would be next to low-rise residential properties, it would be in keeping with the character and appearance of the area which has a blend of different scaled development, due to its design, height, mass and scale. “I do not consider that the building would be incongruous and dominant.”
Disgraceful. Priorities are all wrong, you walk around the city and shop after shop is closing, House of Fraser are in trouble so very unlikely to be the cornerstone of the Northgate Development which will now need a whole new total rethink.
Meanwhile the city is being swamped by restaurants, bars and fast food outlets. The whole balance for of the city has changed, and is rapidly losing its place as a great varied shopping experience.
There seems to be an obsession with providing more and places of student accommodation, who of course will be good customers for all the bars and fast food outlets, but whether they help the city’s economy, I’m not sure.
As far as building houses etc. We in Penymynydd and Penyfford are in the middle of a saturation housing crisis as I speak.
There seems to be a plan to turn Penymynydd and Penyfford into a “town” If this is deliberate, no contingency has been made for all the hundreds of extra people and cars, there is one shop, two schools are closing and the third school is being enlarged, but certainly not enough to cope with the input from the amount of newcomers. The water and electric services are the same that has always been for two small villages.
On one estate in Penymynydd, there has been built a “Sewage Tank” this takes all the Sewage from the estate during daylight hours, at midnight the tank is pumped empty down into the Sewage system in Penyfford. If the Sewage was discharged as normal during the day, the sewage system could not cope and would flood. This is before another two large housing estates are built,, which like Chester, will eventually get built despite appeals and Public hearings etc.
As far as the “Green belt” that is shrinking fast, you only have to look at the developmens opposite The Kings school and Broughton to realise Chester and North Wales are getting nearer and nearer.
We all know that houses are needed, but if what happening around here, the houses being built are not “starter homes” or homes for families on lower incomes, apart from the token handful usually included in most of the housing developments.


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1 Paul Carden
post Jan 18 2018, 03:15 PM
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QUOTE (Neil Fishers Biggest Fan @ Jan 9 2018, 08:59 PM) *
QUOTE (3mm @ Jan 9 2018, 06:46 PM) *
More student accommodation is to be built in Newtown, despite unanimous protests from CWaC's planning committee.

Chester Standard

The council leader has slammed a government planning inspector's decision to allow a huge eight-storey student accommodation block to be built in Chester. Members of Cheshire West and Chester Council's (CWaC) planning committee unanimously rejected PJ Properties (Chester) Ltd's application for the 376-bed block on Hoole Way in April last year. But it has emerged that the company's appeal to The Planning Inspectorate against the council's decision has been successful. And to rub salt into the wounds, the developer has applied for CWaC to foot the bill for all costs associated with the appeal.

Council leader Samantha Dixon responded with shock on Twitter, saying: “I am staggered and dismayed by the inspector's decision. Does democracy mean nothing?”. And Reg Barritt, who has campaigned against the 'studentification' of Chester for many years, was similarly appalled. Mr Barritt, the general secretary of campaign group Chester Community Voice UK, told the Standard that local democracy meant nothing in the face of current national planning policies. “The people that are the community of Chester are very much side-lined while predatory development interests overrun the place in which we live,” he said. “Our councillors seem powerless to do much about it.”

He suggested the city needs to reintroduce 'area forum meetings' so residents could raise concerns and join forces to oppose a perceived tidal wave of student accommodation developments. This newspaper reported in April that plans had been rejected for PJ Properties' £30 million student block on land near Black Diamond Street and Hoole Way, near the Royal Mail centre and railway bridge. Having visited the site and heard residents' concerns, locally-elected councillors on the planning committee queued up to slam the proposals. Cllr Gill Watson said: “It looks awful. It's just not something I can support.” And Cllr Eleanor Johnson added: “It's huge, it's enormous; it's totally out of keeping.” Members said that nearby homes would be completely dwarfed by the student block, and would likely receive little natural light.

“They're going to be blacked out completely,” said Cllr Norman Wright. “They will need lights on in the middle of the day!”. Cllr Dixon, council leader, said she agreed with comments by The Civic Trust that the plans resembled the much-maligned former Travelodge on the city's fountains roundabout. “It's an excellent example of 'pile it high and sell it cheap',” she told the committee. Lisa Miller, representing 50 households with residents' group Newtown Chester Locals, said the noise and mess caused by students would irrevocably affect people's quality of life. “It will create a chaotic parking crisis,” she added.

Ben Roberts, representing the applicant, had tried in vain to convince members that the development represented a “high quality building” fit for a gateway into the city. By offering dedicated student accommodation it would free up 100 to 150 traditional homes in the city and “help the university attract the best students”, he said. The main entrance was on Hoole Way, meaning local businesses would benefit and the students would not need to venture into Black Diamond Street and St Anne Street.

However, his words failed to hit their mark and the application was rejected on the grounds of design, scale and impact on public amenity. But the developer lodged an appeal and nine months later planning inspector Andrew McGlone announced his decision. He wrote: “In my judgement, even though the proposed building would be next to low-rise residential properties, it would be in keeping with the character and appearance of the area which has a blend of different scaled development, due to its design, height, mass and scale. “I do not consider that the building would be incongruous and dominant.”
Disgraceful. Priorities are all wrong, you walk around the city and shop after shop is closing, House of Fraser are in trouble so very unlikely to be the cornerstone of the Northgate Development which will now need a whole new total rethink.
Meanwhile the city is being swamped by restaurants, bars and fast food outlets. The whole balance for of the city has changed, and is rapidly losing its place as a great varied shopping experience.
There seems to be an obsession with providing more and places of student accommodation, who of course will be good customers for all the bars and fast food outlets, but whether they help the city’s economy, I’m not sure.
As far as building houses etc. We in Penymynydd and Penyfford are in the middle of a saturation housing crisis as I speak.
There seems to be a plan to turn Penymynydd and Penyfford into a “town” If this is deliberate, no contingency has been made for all the hundreds of extra people and cars, there is one shop, two schools are closing and the third school is being enlarged, but certainly not enough to cope with the input from the amount of newcomers. The water and electric services are the same that has always been for two small villages.
On one estate in Penymynydd, there has been built a “Sewage Tank” this takes all the Sewage from the estate during daylight hours, at midnight the tank is pumped empty down into the Sewage system in Penyfford. If the Sewage was discharged as normal during the day, the sewage system could not cope and would flood. This is before another two large housing estates are built,, which like Chester, will eventually get built despite appeals and Public hearings etc.
As far as the “Green belt” that is shrinking fast, you only have to look at the developmens opposite The Kings school and Broughton to realise Chester and North Wales are getting nearer and nearer.
We all know that houses are needed, but if what happening around here, the houses being built are not “starter homes” or homes for families on lower incomes, apart from the token handful usually included in most of the housing developments.


Vote for Brexit, knock 20% of the value of sterling and then complain when retailers close? Probably best to think these things through. Also the part I've highlighted makes no sense. Students will come here and spend money in Chester establishments but won't improve help the city's economy? Right.


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